Posts Tagged ‘Poker’

For the first time in recent memory, the members of the World Series of Poker (WSOP) November Nine will reunite under one roof at the Foxwoods Mega Stack Challenge on February 8th. The gathering will take the form of a three-table, 27-man tournament featuring Foxwoods qualifiers and members of the 2010 WSOP November Nine.

Jonathan Duhamel became the first Canadian WSOP Main Event champ ever after defeating Floridian John Racener in November at the Rio in Las Vegas. Now, the action moves 2,000 miles eastward to the forests of Connecticut. The Main Event in Las Vegas featured the third cycle of the November Nine format, which saw the $10,000 buy-in poker tournament paused for four months starting in July once its final table was determined.

Poker News Daily Guest Columnist and Foxwoods ambassador Bernard Lee commented in a press release distributed on Monday that he was looking forward to this once-in-a-lifetime occurrence: “This will be a legendary reunion watched by the entire poker community. Not only will the November Nine meet at Foxwoods to resurrect memories of their last game, the players will also test their skills against the casino’s strongest poker players.”

Foxwoods will be filling the seats in the three-table event through qualifiers taking place between now and February 3rd. Then, the 19th Mega Stack Challenge will get underway on February 4th and stretch for nine days. The series boasts $400,000 in guaranteed prize money spread across six events, the granddaddy being a $1,200 buy-in No Limit Hold’em tournament with a $150,000 purse. The $1,200 buy-in contest begins on February 12th and runs for two days. It awards players starting stacks of 40,000 in chips and blind levels run for 50 minutes apiece until the final table, when they’ll be extended by 10 minutes.

In addition to facing off against each other, members of the November Nine will host events during the Mega Stack Challenge XIX in the casino’s World Poker Tour (WPT) branded poker room. Joining Duhamel and Racener will be seven other household names: Joseph Cheong, Filippo Candio, Michael Mizrachi, John Dolan, Jason Senti, Matt Jarvis, and Soi Nguyen.

Three separate $75,000 Guaranteed tournaments are also part of the Mega Stack Challenge schedule. One is a $600 buy-in No Limit Hold’em tournament that begins on February 4th and crowns a champion the next day. It offers up starting stacks of 20,000 in chips and ticks off blind levels every 45 minutes. The second $75,000 Guaranteed contest is a $400 buy-in two-day event that starts on February 10th, 48 hours after the big November Nine reunion. Players will collect starting stacks of 15,000 and blind levels will run for 40 minutes.

The final $75,000 Guaranteed tournament boasts a $300 buy-in and offers up 10,000-chip stacks. The price of poker will go up every half hour and two starting days will be held, one on February 7th and one on February 8th. The finals will take place on February 9th and the first day of every event begins promptly at 11:00am ET. Single-table satellites to each tournament are also available and start at an affordable $75.

You can listen to Lee break down the news in an exclusive video interview right here on Poker News Daily. The Foxwoods pro told us, “I don’t ever remember hearing that the full World Series Main Event final table ever reassembled again and so I really believe that this is part of history that they’ll all be back together again. I think it’ll be an exciting time for the world of poker and it’ll be exiting at Foxwoods during the Mega Stack.”

Foxwoods is about a 2.5 hour drive from the Big Apple and less than two hours from Boston. Providence, Hartford, and Worcester are all with an hours’ striking distance. We’ll have more information for you on the November Nine reunion at Foxwoods on February 8th as it develops.

On Saturday night, the finals of the Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship continued on GSN. The four-handed final table saw its first elimination and the show ended with three teams left standing. Teammates alternate action by street in the Doubles Poker Championship suite at the Golden Nugget in Downtown Las Vegas.

Howard Lederer and Phil Gordon were the chip leaders entering Saturday’s Doubles Poker Championship episode with a stack of 873,000, while Chris Ferguson and Phil Ivey owned the second largest tally at 593,000. PartyPoker pro Tony G and cash game specialist David Benyamine entered in third place with 389,000 and Huck Seed and Allen Cunningham were the low men on the totem pole at 145,000. The top team receives $1 million, while, in a steep payout structure, the fourth place team walks away with just $100,000.

Seed and Cunningham doubled up to over 300,000 with A-K against K-J when the board ran out five cards eight or lower. Shortly thereafter, Lederer raised to 47,000 before the flop with A-9 and Seed re-raised to 86,000 with 5-4 of hearts. Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship commentator Brandon Adams speculated that Seed meant to call, but inadvertently raised. Either way, Lederer called and the flop came 7-A-4, giving each team a pair.

Cunningham bet 80,000 with bottom pair and Gordon raised all-in over the top with a pair of aces. Cunningham called for time to consult with Seed, who owns the best record in National Heads-Up Poker Championship history. Seed admitted that the call was “borderline” and Cunningham elected to call all-in. The turn was an eight and the river was a six, giving Seed and Cunningham a miracle straight for the win. Gordon stood up and paced around in dismay after seeing the gutshot straight draw hit on the river.

In a subsequent hand, Ivey raised to 40,000 pre-flop with pocket nines and the entire table folded. As a result, his team became the chip leaders and an elaborate reference to Ivey as “god-like” was made. Then, his partner, Ferguson, open-shoved all-in with pocket deuces and Tony G insta-called all-in with K-9. Tony G dubbed a king on the flop “The Butcher of Baghdad” and a running 10-J gave Tony G and Benyamine a double up.

However, their elation would be short-lived, as on the very next hand, Tony G called pre-flop with Q-J of diamonds and told Lederer, in the big blind with A-Q, “I am ready to call a significant raise.” Lederer raised and, true to his word, Tony G instantly moved all-in. Lederer called to put Tony G and Benyamine at risk. The board fell 5-8-K-8-6 and Tony G and Benyamine became the first casualties of the Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship final table. They earned $100,000 collectively, essentially getting their $50,000 buy-ins back.

Cunningham faced another tough decision to close out Saturday’s episode. He made a continuation bet with pocket fives on a 2-3-6 flop only to be met with an all-in from Gordon, who held A-Q. Cunningham tanked before releasing the best hand and would later move all-in over the top of a raise from Ivey, who sent A-3 into the muck.

The Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship continues next Saturday at 8:00pm ET on GSN. Check your local listings for more details.

Harrah’s Entertainment Inc., the world’s largest casino company and owner of the World Series of Poker brand, filed an initial public offering (IPO) with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday. The company is going public just three years after private equity firms Apollo and TPG Capital took it private for $30.7 billion, and hopes to raise as much as $575 million in stock to finish planned projects in Las Vegas and Ohio.

Harrah’s said on Tuesday in a U.S. regulatory filing that it will use the proceeds of the IPO to finish its 660-room Octavius Tower at Caesars Las Vegas, develop the LINQ retail and entertainment area next to the Flamingo on the Las Vegas Strip, and invest in the potential joint venture development of two Ohio casinos with Rock Gaming LLC. Harrah’s said in the filing that Apollo and TPG, the company’s largest shareholders, would retain their controlling interest, but didn’t release the firms’ ownership percentages.

Also included in the Harrah’s IPO is New York hedge fund company Paulson & Co. Inc., which is following through on arrangements that were set in August by selling its 9.9% stake in Harrah’s. Paulson & Co. Inc. got its stake in exchange for taking on $710.3 million in debt. The hedge fund bought most of that debt, $532 million, for $354.9 million – nearly two-thirds of its face value.

Harrah’s has been suffering through an economic downturn since the recession hit in 2008 and has taken steps to lower its debt load and interest expenses over the past year. The company, which owns or manages 52 casinos in seven countries, reported $8.9 billion in revenue in 2009, but said it lost $274 million on $2.2 billion in revenue during the second quarter this year. As of June 30, Harrah’s had a long-term debt of $23.3 billion, mostly due in 2015 or later. It assumed $12.4 billion in debt with the takeover by affiliates of Apollo and TPG in January 2008.

Still, there appears to be a bright light at the end of the tunnel for the world’s largest gambling company. In the filing to the Nevada Gaming Control Board requesting to sell the stock, Harrah’s alluded to recent upswings in Las Vegas tourism numbers. In August, gaming revenue soared 21% on the Strip, where Harrah’s owns and operates eight different casinos. That, along with the fact that visitation to Las Vegas has increased or been flat for 12 straight months, may attract investors. Some industry experts are even anticipating close to $1 billion in IPO sales.

“Our industry is heavily dependent upon both the leisure and business traveler,” Harrah’s said in the filing. “The trends in both of these areas have turned positive over the past few quarters, as evidenced by increasing hotel occupancy, visitor counts and convention space booking.”

The move by Harrah’s comes less than a week after rival MGM Resorts International unveiled plans to raise more than $517 million through a stock offering of some 40.9 million shares. Like Harrah’s, MGM has been saddled with a heavy debt load for quite some time, and proceeds from MGM’s sale will go toward its repayment.

Stay tuned to Poker News Daily for updates on the Harrah’s Entertainment IPO.

On Saturday night, the first of two semifinal matches of the Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship played out on GSN. Eight players took to the felt for the hour-long program and the top two teams advanced to the finals. In the semifinals, each team received two 30-second timeouts to talk strategy and players who advanced to the finals kept their teammates.

David Tuchman and Brandon Adams had the call of the Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship, while Lacey Jones conducted interviews and provided commentary from the sideline.

Teammates alternate action by street and each pair received 5,000 in chips per point earned during the regular season. Consequently, Howard Lederer and Phil Gordon began with a stack of 550,000, Vivek “Psyduck” Rajkumar and Greg “FBT” Mueller began with a stack of 510,000, Andrew “luckychewy” Lichtenberger and Nick Schulman began with 460,000, and Allen Cunningham and Huck Seed were the low men on the totem pole at 395,000.

In one of the first major pots of the night, Schulman raised it up to 35,000 with pocket queens and Gordon moved all-in with a scant 8-6 of clubs. Low on chips, Schulman called all-in and his team flopped a set. Lichtenberger and Schulman became the chip leaders with a stack of 672,000 despite entering the match with just the third largest tally.

Rajkumar and Mueller eventually met their demise in brutal fashion. Cunningham raised to 45,000 pre-flop with A-Q and Rajkumar pushed with K-Q. Cunningham called the all-in and the first four cards ran out 10-9-K-K, giving Rajkumar and Mueller trip kings. However, Cunningham and Seed hit a jack on the river to make Broadway and send their opponents packing as the first casualty of the semifinals. Seed and Cunningham crossed the one million chip mark as a result of delivering the four-outer.

Three-handed, Schulman shoved before the flop with A-2 and Cunningham woke up with pocket queens. The board bricked out for Schulman and Lichtenberger, who were eliminated. Lederer, Gordon, Seed, and Cunningham all officially made the finals. However, the match was not over, as the first place team in each semifinal would start the finals with 600,000 in chips, while the runner-ups would start with 400,000. Consequently, the quartet played on to a winner.

In the first major hand of heads-up play, Lederer moved all-in with Q-J and Seed made the call after much deliberation with K-10. The board ran out 6-4-6-J-A, giving Lederer and Gordon a pair of jacks and a 2:1 chip lead.

Then, Seed made it 100,000 before the flop with A-4 and Lederer called behind with K-Q of spades. The flop came A-J-5 and Gordon led out for 100,000 with a straight draw. Cunningham min-raised to 200,000 and Gordon pushed all-in over the top. Cunningham called all-in and the board ran out A-2 to secure the double up for Seed and Cunningham. Gordon and Lederer were crippled to one big blind as a result.

Gordon ultimately moved all-in blind with J-6 of hearts and Cunningham made the call with A-2. With a 50% chip advantage in the Doubles Poker Championship finals hanging in the balance, Cunningham and Seed flopped three aces, leaving Gordon and Lederer drawing dead to the turn. Cunningham and Seed, who entered the semifinals in last place, will start the finals with 600,000 in chips, while Gordon and Lederer will come armed with 400,000. Two more teams will join them.

Next week, the second semifinal match will play out during the course of the one-hour episode. Catch the Full Tilt Doubles Poker Championship every Saturday at 9:00pm ET on GSN.

Straight Flush: Five cards in sequence, of the same suit.

In the event of a tie: Highest rank at the top of the sequence wins.

The best possible straight flush is royal flush – ace, king, queen, jack and ten of a suit. A royal flush is an unbeatable hand.

Four of a Kind: Four cards of the same rank, and one side card or ‘kicker’.

In the event of a tie: Highest four of a kind wins.

Full House: Three cards of the same rank, and two cards of a different matching rank.

In the event of a tie: Highest three matching cards wins the pot. In community card games where players have the same three matching cards, the highest value of the two matching cards wins.

Flush: Five cards of the same suit.

In the event of a tie: The player holding the highest ranked card wins. If necessary up to fifth-highest cards can be used to break the tie.

Straight: Five cards in sequence.

In the event of a tie: Highest ranking card at the top of the sequence wins.

Three of a kind: Three cards of the same rank and two unrelated side cards.

In the event of a tie: Highest ranking three of a kind wins. In community card games where players have the same three of a kind, the highest side card, and if necessary, the second-highest side card wins.

Two pair: 2×2 pair of cards of a matching rank, another two cards of a different matching rank, and one side card.

In the event of a tie: Highest pair wins. If players have the same highest pair, highest second pair wins. If both players have two identical pairs, highest side card wins.

One pair: Two cards of a matching rank, and three unrelated side cards.

In the event of a tie: Highest pair wins. If players have the same pair, the highest side card wins, and if necessary, the second-highest and third-highest side card can be used.

High card: Any hand that does not qualify under a category listed above.

In the event of a tie: Highest card wins, and if necessary up to fourth-highest and smallest card can be used to break the tie.

Tournaments are poker competitions where all of the players play at the same time and continue to play until only one player is left. Tournaments are fun to play in, have a low entry fees and offer a large prize pool to be won. For these reasons they are a very popular. They are inexpensive way for novice poker players to learn how to play the game, as well as a providing a place for more experienced players gain experience.

While there are many different types of poker games played at casinos and online rooms, tournament play is usually reserved for Texas Hold’em, Omaha, and 7-card Stud, because these games have a large following.

Poker tournaments can have as few as 6 players (single table tournaments) to thousands of players for larger events. Large tournaments consist of many tables, each table having 8 to 10 players. The tables are slowly removed from the tourney as players are eliminated, and players are balanced from table to table as needed. (These are known as multi-table tournaments). Finally all but the last table will be removed and these last 8 to 10 players play until only one of them remains.

Tournaments are poker competitions where all of the players play at the same time and continue to play until only one player is left.

Full Tilt Poker
Tournaments
Today’s Tournaments at Full Tilt Poker
Midnight Madness!

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$20,000.00

$23,000 KO Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$70.00
* Prize Pool:$23,000.00

11,10€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2 + $0.20 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:06 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

1,15€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:11 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$1.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$5 + $0.50 Tournament

* Game:HA
* Time:00:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2,000 Guarantee

* Game:Stud H/L
* Time:00:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$24.00
* Prize Pool:$2,000.00

$30K Super Turbo Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$100.00
* Prize Pool:$30,000.00

$20 + $2 Tournament

* Game:Omaha H/L
* Time:00:21 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$20.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$12,500 Guarantee (Rebuy)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$20.00
* Prize Pool:$12,500.00

$5 + $0.50 Rebuy (1r+1a)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:36 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

2,25€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:41 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$50 + $5 Tournament

* Game:Omaha Hi
* Time:00:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$50.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$10 + $1 Tournament

* Game:Stud Hi
* Time:00:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$3 + $0.30 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:00:51 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$18,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$24.00
* Prize Pool:$18,000.00

Turbo Fiddy

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$50.00
* Prize Pool:$17,500.00

$5 + $0.50 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:06 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

3,35€ KO Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:11 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$10 + $1 Tournament

* Game:Razz
* Time:01:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2 + $0.20 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:21 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$12,500 Guarantee (1r+1a)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$30.00
* Prize Pool:$12,500.00

The Ferguson

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$1.00
* Prize Pool:$500.00

$3 + $0.30 Rebuy

* Game:Omaha H/L
* Time:01:36 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$10K Super Turbo Knockout

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:36 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$16.00
* Prize Pool:$10,000.00

1,15€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:41 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$1.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$150 Freeroll

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:01:43 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$0.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$10 + $1 Tournament

* Game:Stud H/L
* Time:01:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$20,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:00 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$69.00
* Prize Pool:$20,000.00

$10,000 Rush Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$10,000.00

5,55€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2 + $0.20 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:06 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

2,25€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:11 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$30 + $3 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$30.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$5 + $0.50 Tournament

* Game:Omaha Hi
* Time:02:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$3 + $0.30 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:21 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

100€ Freeroll

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:23 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$0.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

Turbo $4K Guarantee (Cashout)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$20.00
* Prize Pool:$4,000.00

250€ Super Turbo Garanti

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$250.00

$18,000 Rush Guar (Rebuy)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:36 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$18,000.00

3,35€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:41 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$10 + $1 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$3 + $0.30 Tournament

* Game:HOSE
* Time:02:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2 + $0.20 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:02:51 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$4,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$24.00
* Prize Pool:$4,000.00

Turbo Hundo

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$100.00
* Prize Pool:$20,000.00

300€ KO Garanti

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$300.00

$3 + $0.30 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:06 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

1,15€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:11 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$1.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2 + $0.20 Tournament

* Game:Omaha H/L
* Time:03:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$6K Super Turbo Knockout

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$24.50
* Prize Pool:$6,000.00

1K€ Weekly Freeroll Qualifier

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:22 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$0.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$10 + $1 Rebuy

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$9,000 Rush Guar (Rebuy)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:36 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$3.00
* Prize Pool:$9,000.00

$100 New Zealand Freeroll

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:41 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$0.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

2,25€ Tournoi

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:41 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$150 Freeroll

* Game:Omaha Hi
* Time:03:43 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$0.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$5 + $0.50 Tournament

* Game:Razz
* Time:03:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$2K Super Turbo Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$2,000.00

$2 + $0.20 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:03:51 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$2.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$12,500 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:04:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$50.00
* Prize Pool:$12,500.00

1.000€ Garanti

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:04:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$24.50
* Prize Pool:$1,000.00

$5 + $0.50 Tournament

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:04:06 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

1.000€ Garanti

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:10:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$5.00
* Prize Pool:$1,000.00

MiniFTOPS Event #5 (1r+1a)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:13:02 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$20.00
* Prize Pool:$250,000.00

10.000€ Garanti

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:14:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$150.00
* Prize Pool:$10,000.00

$60,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:15:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$150.00
* Prize Pool:$60,000.00

$30 + $3 Tournament

* Game:Stud Hi
* Time:15:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$30.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$25,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:15:30 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$50.00
* Prize Pool:$25,000.00

Baltic Challenge – Round 1

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:15:41 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$0.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

$40,000 Guarantee (Rebuy)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:16:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$100.00
* Prize Pool:$40,000.00

$6,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:16:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$69.00
* Prize Pool:$6,000.00

$35,000 KO Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:17:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$120.00
* Prize Pool:$35,000.00

2,5K€ Turbo Garanti

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:17:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$100.00
* Prize Pool:$2,500.00

MiniFTOPS Event #6

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:17:04 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$31.00
* Prize Pool:$150,000.00

$50 + $5 Heads-Up Shootout

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:17:06 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$50.00
* Prize Pool:$0.00

Turbo $50K Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:18:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$200.00
* Prize Pool:$50,000.00

$33,000 Guarantee (1r+1a)

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:19:31 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$100.00
* Prize Pool:$33,000.00

$75,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:20:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$150.00
* Prize Pool:$75,000.00

Daily Dollar

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:20:16 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$1.00
* Prize Pool:$10,000.00

$5,000 Guarantee

* Game:7-Game
* Time:20:46 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$69.00
* Prize Pool:$5,000.00

Friday Night Fight

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:21:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$500.00
* Prize Pool:$100,000.00

MiniFTOPS Event #7

* Game:Stud H/L
* Time:21:02 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$20.00
* Prize Pool:$25,000.00

Daily Double – B

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:21:03 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$8,000.00

Daily Double – A

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:21:03 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$10.00
* Prize Pool:$8,000.00

The Fifty-Fifty

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:21:30 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$50.00
* Prize Pool:$50,000.00

$30,000 Guarantee

* Game:Hold’em
* Time:23:01 EDT, September 10th 2010
* Buy-In:$100.00
* Prize Pool:$30,000.00

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Tournaments are fun to play in, have a low entry fees and offer a large prize pool to be won. For these reasons they are a very popular. They are inexpensive way for novice poker players to learn how to play the game, as well as a providing a place for more experienced players gain experience.

While there are many different types of poker games played at casinos and online rooms, tournament play is usually reserved for Texas Hold’em, Omaha, and 7-card Stud, because these games have a large following.

Poker tournaments can have as few as 6 players (single table tournaments) to thousands of players for larger events. Large tournaments consist of many tables, each table having 8 to 10 players. The tables are slowly removed from the tourney as players are eliminated, and players are balanced from table to table as needed. (These are known as multi-table tournaments). Finally all but the last table will be removed and these last 8 to 10 players play until only one of them remains.

Tournament Basics

To play in a tournament players have to pay two fees. They have to pay an entry fee to the poker room hosting the tournament to cover the expenses involved. This gives the player an assigned seat and a set quantity of tournament chips with which to play (these chips have no cash value). Players also pay a buy-in fee. The buy-in fee is held and paid out as prizes. The prize payout differs from tournament to tournament but typically it all goes to the few players fortunate enough to make the final table.

The object of a tournament is to win all of the chips. All tournament players start out with the same quantity of chips to play with and all start playing at the same time. Players play until they lose all of their chips and are then removed from the tournament. A tournament continues non-stop, often for several hours, until only one person remains. As playing progresses the stakes rise (Blinds are doubled on a timed interval), making it more and more difficult for players with short stacks to remain in the game.

Players are awarded prize money based on their finishing position in the tournament. The top finishers earn the most money with the 1st place winner usually receiving about 30% of the total prize money, the 2nd place winner about 20% and so on. The number of winners and the size of the payouts depend upon the rules for the tournament being played and the number of people playing.

Re-buys and Add-ons

Some poker tournaments allow players a re-buy option. This re-buy option allows players to purchase more chips if they run out of them at the start of the tournament. A player can purchase the same number of chips that he/she started the tournament with. Some poker tournaments allow unlimited re-buys during the first hour of play, while other tournaments allow only a single re-buy.

An add-on option is similar to the re-buy option. Add-ons differ in that they are usually only offered once at the end of the re-buy period and can be purchased regardless of how many chips you have. As the name implies these chips are added on to your stack of chips.

All proceeds from re-buys and add-ons are added to the prize pool less house fees (if applicable).

Betting

Tournament betting is structured with the betting limit increasing regularly. The changes in betting limits occur differently depending on the tournament; some are timed while some increase the limit after a set number of rounds are played.

Balancing and Collapsing Tables

Larger tournaments start out with more than one table, each having 8 to 10 players. As the tournament progresses players will be eliminated and the number of players at each table will not remain the same. For the tournament to be fair the number of players at each table should be the same, so the organizers move players from table to table in an attempt to keep all the tables equally populated.

Balancing is the practice of moving players from full tables to less full tables when the difference is 3 or more players.

Collapsing tables is the practice of removing tables once there are enough empty spaces among the rest of the tables to do so. Thus with 10 player tables when there are 10 empty spaces the players from one table are moved to empty spaces and that table is taken out of play.

Matthew is a frequent player who offers reviews and shares his experiences playing poker online at http://www.playrealpokeronline.com.